Month: May 2022

New and Notable: What I read this week — Version 177

Weekly research

Wearing a mask, even at rest, increases CO2 levels excessively.

Eating more protein during weight loss stops muscle wasting and improves the overall quality of food.

In patients with advanced stage kidney disease, a very low protein diet does not provide any benefits.

Vitamin B12 deficiency is catastrophic for children (and everyone).

More energy, less frustration.

The more species you see on the coast, the better.

New Primal Kitchen Podcast

Primal Kitchen Podcast Episode 29: Childhood Behavior and Pregnancy Care with Pediatrician Ari Calhoun

Primary Health Coach Radio: Chandler Walker

Media, Schmidia

I’m not optimistic.

Lettuce is the most common cause of food poisoning.

Interesting blog post

Why are we basing our food policy on terrible, unknown, often misinformation?

The trees are good.

Social notes

Because it’s not about the environment.

Let the kids be kids (and learn from them!)

Everything else

When you exercise your blood is anti-cancer.

The usefulness of strangeness.

The things I’m talking about and interested in

Ancient Renaissance: Tradition often gets things right.

Agree: To really fix food-related diseases, we must look inwards.

Interesting threads: The genomics of the population in ancient Eurasia.

I would be surprised: The Dietary Guidance Committee can deal with ultraprocessed foods.

A tragedy on all fronts: slavery did not even contribute to the rise of the American economy.

The question I’m asking

Are you weird

Recipe Corner

  • Crispy shale and shale oil: a method.
  • One of the best salads in the world: Lab.

Time capsules

One year ago (April 30 – May 6)

  • How to Grill Everything — Ultimate Guide করুন Grill everything.
  • Habit Stacking Microworkouts (aka working without thinking about it) – Workout your life.

Comments of the week

“I don’t like arrogant, arrogant, narcissistic alpha people… unless they’re my surgeons!”

-Scientist, paleoprogressive.

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This post is new and significant: what I read this week — version 177 first appeared on Marx Daily Apple.

The FDA has announced plans to reduce the infant formula deficit: shots

Baby Formula has been in short supply in many stores around the United States for several months.

Scott Olson / Getty Images


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Scott Olson / Getty Images


Baby Formula has been in short supply in many stores around the United States for several months.

Scott Olson / Getty Images

Parents struggling to find the baby’s source may soon find some relief.

Abbott Nutrition, one of the largest formula manufacturers in the United States, has reached an agreement with the government to reopen a closed factory and increase production.

Abbott closed his facility in Stargis, Mitch, in February after several children became ill after drinking the formula. Two of them died of bacterial infections.

The judiciary has filed a lawsuit against Abbott, alleging that the factory failed to comply with quality and safety regulations. Now Abbott and the government have agreed on a proposed settlement to resolve the complaint. The Michigan facility needs a third-party expert to help resume production and help securely increase supply.

In a written statement, Abbott said that after FDA approval, production at the facility could resume within two weeks. It will take another six to eight weeks to get the formula from the plant on the grocery shelves.

Meanwhile, the FDA is announcing other plans to reduce the nationwide shortage of resources. FDA Commissioner Robert Calif acknowledged the struggles many parents face.

“We know many parents and caregivers are frustrated by their inability to access the necessary or preferred baby formula and complex medical foods,” Calliffe said in an FDA briefing.

And he announced that the FDA was relaxing some restrictions on manufacturers that could sell baby formula in the United States: “Our new guidelines extend the power of companies that do not normally sell baby formula in this country to the US market to make their products available.”

Callie said the flexibility would mean “excess products could quickly hit U.S. stores.”

“We’re throwing a wide net,” said Susan Maine, director of the FDA’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition. “We are looking for manufacturers around the world who can have products that can meet our standards for both nutrition and food security.”

He said the FDA would help get the product to the United States.

The FDA is allowing more flexibility for baby formula produced in the United States. Preference will be given to manufacturers who can demonstrate safety and nutritional adequacy and they can get products on the fastest U.S. shelves.

“We’re focused on getting as many products as possible on store shelves,” said Frank Yanas, FDA’s deputy commissioner for food policy and response.

“And we’re not going to rest until the baby formula market is normal.”

New research provides clues as to why some children die of SIDS

Scientists in Australia have found that some children at risk of sudden infant death syndrome, or SIDS, have low levels of an enzyme called butyrlcholinesterase (BChE) in their blood. Their study, published May 6 in the journal Ibiomedicine, could pave the way for newborn screening and intervention if the results are confirmed by further research.

“This is the first time we have had a potential biomarker of SIDS,” said Dr Carmel Harrington, who led the research at Westmead Children’s Hospital in Sydney, Australia.

Researchers have been trying for decades to chip in the biological underpinnings of Puzzling Syndrome. And although public health campaigns have greatly reduced the incidence of SIDS, it remains a major cause of sudden and unexpected deaths of children under 1 year of age in Western countries. In the United States, approximately 3,400 children die suddenly and unexpectedly each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This includes children who die suddenly due to known causes like suffocation, as well as those who die without any obvious cause like SIDS. About half of all sudden and unexpected infant deaths (SUIDs) in the United States are caused by SIDS.

One of the reasons SIDS is so tragic and mysterious is because it is probably not caused by a single biological process, but rather a combination of factors that combine with a perfect storm, says Dr. Thomas Keynes says previous research by Engels has pointed to reduced activity or damage to certain parts of children’s brains that control heartbeat, breathing and arousal from sleep, as well as environmental stressors such as soft bed or secondhand smoke.

“The concern among researchers is that some children die from SIDS because they do not wake up in response to a dangerous situation while they are asleep,” said Dr. Keynes.

To test whether SIDS was inherently different in children, Dr. Harrington and colleagues compared dried blood samples from the heel prick test of 655 healthy newborns, 26 children who died of SIDS and 41 children who died of other causes. They found that nine out of ten children who died of SIDS had significantly lower BChE levels than children in the other two groups.

“I was just shocked,” said Dr. Harrington, who has been looking for clues and crowdfunding for his research for almost 30 years since he lost one of his own children to SIDS. “Parents of children with SIDS carry a lot of guilt because their child died within hours. But what we found in this study is that these children are born different, the difference is hidden and no one knew before. So it’s not the parents’ fault. “

Dr Richard Goldstein, a pediatric palliative care specialist at Boston Children’s Hospital, said the new findings support researchers’ hypothesis that children who die from SIDS have arousal problems. BChE plays a role in the availability of important neurotransmitters in the excitatory pathways of the brain. Low levels of the enzyme may indicate that the brain is unable to send signals to a child to wake up, turn his head, or breathe. “But we need more research before we can understand its true meaning,” said Dr. Goldstein.

Although the study identifies an important chemical marker in a small group of children, it is too early to say whether a comprehensive test would be helpful for BChE.

For one, scientists and doctors do not know what a “normal” level of enzyme looks like. And Australian researchers did not have access to fresh blood samples for BChE, so they did not measure absolute levels of the enzyme. There was overlap between the children. Some children who died of SIDS had BCHE levels within the same range as those who did not die.

“If you’re going to test every baby that is born, you want the results to stand out as abnormal only for babies who are at very high risk,” said Dr. Keynes. Even if further studies subtly help the BChE test to accurately differentiate between children who may die of SIDS and those who can lead healthy lives, doctors and parents will still be faced with a dilemma: what to do next? Currently, there is no intervention or treatment for low BChE levels.

Many suggestions for SIDS prevention remain the same, Dr. Keynes said. Make sure you follow safe sleep recommendations, such as putting your baby on his or her back – both at bedtime and at night. Remove loose sheets, blankets, pillows, bumper pads and soft toys from your baby’s sleeping area. And consider keeping your baby in the same room as you at night for at least six months, or ideally, until your baby is one year old.

The American Academy of Pediatrics also recommends avoiding smoking, alcohol and exposure to illicit drugs during pregnancy; Breastfeeding; Regular vaccinations; And using a pacifier to reduce the risk of SIDS.

To improve Doctor Anywhere, the cloud communications provider taps Vonage

Singapore-based telehealth company Dr Anyhow has begun adopting a video API from US-based cloud communications provider Vonage to increase telehealth service delivery.

Vonage’s communications platform has over one million registered developers who use its APIs to provide business continuity, remote work and remote delivery of various services. It is fully programmable and allows integration of video, voice, chat, messaging, conversation commerce, AI, and existing product, workflow and system verification.

Why it matters

Last year, the DA reported that its video advice quadrupled in one year while the number of physicians on its platform increased by 70%. Currently, its telehealth platform is used by approximately 2.5 million users across Southeast Asia and 3,000 general practitioners and specialist doctors.

“High quality, uninterrupted video services are essential for us to enhance the customer experience of our platform and provide timely medical services to our rapidly expanding user base,” said DA CEO Lim Y. Moon.

To meet the growing demand for digital healthcare, the company has chosen to adopt Vonage’s Video API to enhance video capabilities for providing medical advice through video counseling and providing self-contained Covid-19 tests under supervision.

“We are confident in strengthening our technological capabilities through the integration of the Vonage Video API, allowing our customers to be served in a timely and efficient manner,” Lim said.

Greater trend

Through its video API, telehealth providers can provide “instant” medical advice, says Sunny Rao, Vonage’s SVP for Global Sales.

Over the years, Vonage has driven the telehealth capabilities of Asia-Pacific healthcare providers.

In February of this year, Australian telehealth firm VisionFlex embedded Vonage’s Video API for quality audio and video connection across its telehealth platform and telehealth devices.

Queensland-based elderly care provider Ferrous Care has tapped Vonage to strengthen its virtual social center, which conducts real-time live-streamed healthcare activities for more than 600 members across the country.

Two years ago, Insung Information, a healthcare solutions developer in South Korea, integrated Vonage’s video APIs into its telehealth devices for improved communication.

On the record

“Demand for digital healthcare continues to grow in the Asia-Pacific region and the market value is expected to reach $ 326 billion by 2030. Patients expect access to digital healthcare tools – a behavioral change accelerated by the epidemic. To meet this growing demand for digital healthcare, Healthcare providers need to adopt a reliable and robust platform to enable fast and efficient telehealth delivery, ”Rao said.

Keto sandwich roll-up with dipping sauce – two ways!

Keto sandwich roll-up on plate with primal kitchen ranch dressing, buffalo sauce and tomato basil marinadeLooking for a good keto sandwich alternative, need any bread? Look no further than these low carb, grain-free meats and cheese roll-ups. Who needs bread or tortillas when you have them so delicious? After all, the best part of a sandwich is bread. It’s really important what’s inside.

And these keto roll-ups aren’t your average lettuce wrap! No, these features are crispy cheese on the outside, with delicious fillings perfectly paired with some of our favorite dipping sauces. Enjoy them for a simple work-from-home lunch or after-school breakfast. Cold, they’re great for hitting lunchboxes or trails. A sandwich roll-up is a nice break from the trail mix, when you’re on a long trip. Throw them in a heated lunch bag with a light weight ice pack and you can go.

This recipe suggests making them in an oven, but a toaster oven will also work. Use the ideas below as inspiration to come up with your own meat, cheese, and sauce creations.

Keto sandwich roll-up with dipping sauce recipe

Creates: 3 roll-ups for each recipe variation (1 serving)

Kitchen time: 10 – 12 minutes

Italian cheese roll up

Materials

Directions

Preheat your oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit (190 degrees Celsius). Line a sheet pan with parchment paper.

Arrange your cheese pieces in the pan. Layer the paparni or salami along the middle of the cheese with a leaf or two of basil and sprinkle with Italian spices. Place the sheet pan in the oven for 5 to 7 minutes or until the cheese starts to crisp on the outside edge.

Chopped cheese on top pan with meat and basil

Remove from the oven and quickly and carefully roll the cheese diagonally until each one is in the form of a cylinder roll-up. Use a spatula to prevent burns on your fingers.

When the cheese has cooled a bit, cut it in half and sprinkle with more Italian seasoning, then dip in your favorite Primal Kitchen Mariner sauce!

Buffalo Chicken Cheese Roll Up

Materials

Directions

Preheat your oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit (190 degrees Celsius). Line a sheet pan with parchment paper.

Arrange your cheese pieces in the pan. In a small bowl, mix together the flavored chicken breast, celery, ranch dressing and buffalo sauce. Place a dollop of chicken mixture in the middle of each piece of cheese.

Place the sheet pan in the oven for 5 to 7 minutes or until the outer edges of the cheese start to become crispy. Remove from the oven and quickly and carefully roll the cheese diagonally until each one is in the form of a cylinder roll-up. Use a spatula to prevent burns on your fingers.

When the cheese is a little cold, garnish it with green onions cut in half. Dip in buffalo sauce or ranch dressing!

Buffalo Chicken Roll-Up on a Plate with Primary Kitchen Buffalo Sauce

Advice

  • Look carefully at the pieces of cheese. If they cook too long in the oven, they run the risk of being either burned or overcooked in order to be able to shape properly.
  • Try any other combination of your choice for cheese, fillings and dipping sauces!

Nutrition information:

Italian cheese roll up

  • Calories: 346
  • Total carbohydrates: 4 g
  • Net carbohydrates: 3 g
  • Fat: 24 grams
  • Protein: 27 g

Buffalo Chicken Cheese Roll Up

  • Calories: 520
  • Total carbohydrates: 5 g
  • Net carbohydrates: 5 g
  • Fat: 41 grams
  • Protein: 34 grams

Primal Kitchen Pizza Sauce

Printed

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Description

Looking for a good keto sandwich alternative, which bread is needed? Look no further than these low-carb, grain-free meats and cheese roll-ups with delicious dipping sauce. Use the ideas below as inspiration to come up with your own meat, cheese, and sauce creations!



Italian cheese roll up

Preheat your oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit (190 degrees Celsius). Line a sheet pan with parchment paper.

Arrange your cheese pieces in the pan. Layer the paparni or salami along the middle of the cheese with a leaf or two of basil and sprinkle with Italian spices. Place the sheet pan in the oven for 5 to 7 minutes or until the cheese starts to crisp on the outside edge.

Remove from the oven and quickly and carefully roll the cheese diagonally until each one is in the form of a cylinder roll-up. Use a spatula to prevent burns on your fingers.

When the cheese has cooled a bit, cut it in half and sprinkle with more Italian seasoning, then dip in your favorite Primal Kitchen Mariner sauce!

Buffalo Chicken Cheese Roll Up

Preheat your oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit (190 degrees Celsius). Line a sheet pan with parchment paper.

Arrange your cheese pieces in the pan. In a small bowl, mix together the flavored chicken breast, celery, ranch dressing and buffalo sauce. Place a dollop of chicken mixture in the middle of each piece of cheese.

Place the sheet pan in the oven for 5 to 7 minutes or until the outer edges of the cheese start to become crispy. Remove from the oven and quickly and carefully roll the cheese diagonally until each one is in the form of a cylinder roll-up. Use a spatula to prevent burns on your fingers.

When the cheese is a little cold, garnish it with half chopped green onion. Dip in buffalo sauce or ranch dressing!

Comments

Look carefully at the pieces of cheese. If they cook too long in the oven, they run the risk of being either burned or overcooked in order to be able to shape properly.

  • Time: 5 minutes
  • Cooking time: 5-7 minutes

About the author

A Missouri-based food blogger, recipe developer and personal chef, Priscilla specializes in low-carb, paleo, gluten-free, keto, vegetarian and low FODMAP cuisine. Check out what she’s cooking at Priscilla Cooks and follow her food adventures on Instagram and Pinterest.

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