Indian personalized care platform Zyla Health bagged $ 1M in Pre-Series A fund

Digital health firm Zyla Health recently raised $ 1 million in a pre-series funding round led by venture capital company Seeders.

The round was also attended by Rahul Jain and Uday Thakkar, co-founders of Supermorphic Investment Group, Epigamia, Udit Goenka, CEO of Pitchground and Sumedha Khoche, founder of Kinderpass.

What does this mean?

Founded in 2017, Zyla provides personal care for a variety of health concerns, including heart, kidney, and liver disease, diabetes, and more recently, COVID-19.

Its platform is embedded with an Athena-owned AI engine that helps care teams recommend personalized interventions. It also has a chatbot powered by advanced natural language processing that can decrypt and understand open-ended chat messages from users.

Available on both iOS and Android devices, Zyla offers its health management platform to help insurers ensure cost savings, as well as enable corporations and pharmaceutical companies to scale care.

What is it for

Over the past few quarters, Zyla has seen greater traction from insurers and corporations who have increasingly invested in the well-being of their members and employees. To take this opportunity, “Zyla will use the funds to strengthen leadership and invest in consolidating Zyla’s care products. [Indian health] Ecosystem for growth, ”said Khushbu Agarwal, CEO and Founder.

Snapshots of the market

In the first half of 2022, several digital healthcare companies in India have attracted investment. In April, the telehealth platform Truemeds has raised 22 million in a Series B funding round, which will go into its expansion activities.

Health and fitness companies GOQii recently secured 10 10 million from Hong Kong-based game software and venture capital firm Animoka Brand, to finance the development of its Health Metavers.

In February, mental health startups Hey raised $ 555,000 in a pre-seed fund round.

On record

“The dynamics of personal healthcare [have] There has been a dramatic transformation in recent times. Accuracy, real time, convenience and accurate healthcare management The use of the best digital technology of the new era is the need of the hour. The potential of pioneering companies in this domain is immense and the sky is the limit for such future start-ups. Zyla has quickly made her mark in this landscape and picked it up with the pace of accelerated growth, the times ahead look exciting enough, ”commented Cedars partner Abhishek Rungt.

PainChek to create pain assessment app for children with disabilities

PainChek is creating a version of its mobile pain assessment and monitoring app for children with non-verbal disabilities.

Its development has been supported by a grant of A 392,820 (approximately $ 260,000) from the State Government of Western Australia as part of the Innovation Innovation Seed Fund. The fund raised a total of A $ 8 million ($ 5.45 million) in 17 projects focusing on the health and well-being of Western Australians.

The title of the project is, “Identifying Pain in Children Who Can’t Tell You It Hurts: Paincheck for Children with Disabilities,” led by Jenny Downs of the Telethon Kids Institute with Paincheck.

Why it matters

According to a media release, the project aims to create a digital tool that will allow quick and accurate identification of pain to improve pain management for children who communicate non-verbally.

“Pain is common among children living with disabilities and can have a significant negative impact on their quality of life. For those who are caring for these children, it can be challenging to know when they are in pain,” said Jeff Hughes, chief scientific officer at Paincheck.

The PainChek app uses AI and facial recognition to identify pain for those who cannot self-report. It is being launched worldwide in two stages – the first for adults and the second for children who have not yet learned to speak. Both versions have received regulatory clearance in various markets, including Australia, Europe, the United Kingdom, New Zealand, Singapore and Canada.

Paincheck said it would have the exclusive right to use the intellectual property of the upcoming app for commercialization. It will have “a universal, non-revocable, exclusive and enduring right to develop or refine future pain assessment tools.”

Greater trend

Two weeks ago, ASX-listed PainChek placed an entitlement offer and a share placement to raise about $ 4.59 million to accelerate its global rollout. In particular, the funds will help develop a paycheck app for children.

In May last year, the company received approval in Europe and the UK to commercialize its Paycheck Infant app. It has been cleared for use in children aged one to 12 months.

Q&A: Why Healthcare Paradigm Changes Needed to Receive Digital Therapeutics

Digital Therapeutic Company HappyPhys Health has announced a number of partnerships this year, including collaborations with insurer Eleven Health, formerly Anthem, Maternal Health, and an agreement with pharma company Biogen to target multiple sclerosis patients.

Chris Wassden, chief strategy officer at HappyPhys, says these partnerships add access points for patients who can use their products. Sat down with MobiHealthNews To discuss the company’s partnership strategy, the business environment of digital therapeutics, and how to encourage physician adoption.

MobiHealthNews: HappyFi has recently announced a number of partnerships, including one with Biogen and another with Anthem. Why is this partnership meaningful for your company?

Chris Wasden: For us, we are focusing on the individual patient. That patient goes by different types of titles. Some call them members, if you have a health plan. Some say patient, if you are a physician or pharma company. If you are an employer, some people call them employees. But they are all the same person. They have a star of challenge when it comes to healthcare-related issues.

What we get is that our experience in helping patients solve their mental and physical health problems means that in order to reach that patient, we need to have multiple channels to provide them with our services and offers. This is why you see us in the pharma relationship, the health planning relationship, the employer relationship. I think increasingly you will see that with our healthcare provider relationship as well. Because they are all partners who can help provide services to our patients.

MHN: How do you choose a partner? Does it depend on the condition or the health concerns you are focusing on?

What: You first have to look at it from our perspective of how we sew our products and services together, which we call a sequence. So a sequence is a specific collection of products and services – some ours, some third-party – that we’ve put together around a specific medical condition.

The sequence for us begins with the application of our patient community. Which we call Copa. We have Kopa for pregnancy. We have it for MS. We have it for psoriasis. In that community, our patients help patients, but we then also include physicians. So physicians can help patients in the context of that community.

Then we can try to make people understand how long they have had the disease, what kind of therapy they are doing, what is working, what is not working. We can guide their patient journey towards other digital products and services. These may include things like mental health solutions to our well-being, or it may include an MS-specific product that we have developed that helps patients deal with stress and anxiety, depression and fatigue.

So that’s what we do. We look and see where we can move the needle on mental health in a related medical condition and then set up a sequence. And we will have partners in these sequences. Now we don’t have exclusive contracts with pharma companies or health plans.

So the things that we have announced with Anthem or Biogen we can do with other companies in the same place. Much of this is driven by our patient-centered approach. So if you are an MS patient, for example, you may be on biogen medication one day, you may be on Novartis medication one year from now. Then you can stay in Sanofi’s drug for three years from now.

So you may have to change your medication throughout your patient’s journey. We need to have partners who represent all of your choices so that we can better educate you about your therapeutic options.

MHN: Looking at the more common digital therapeutic space, what do you think the environment is like now? Digital health funding has declined so far this year. Do you think interest in this new method has waned?

What: We have a fundamental view that a disruptive technology – and I will classify digital therapeutics and what we are doing in this space as disruptive – cannot succeed on the same basis and with the same paradigm as existing technologies. Because if it does, it will not be interrupted by definition.

I think what you are seeing right now is the search for the right business model I don’t believe we’re just going to copy the pharma business model and say, “Okay, digital therapeutics are like a drug, so they’ll be paid the same, they’ll be distributed the same, they’ll be used the same.”

We are actually very different. Our methods are different. Our process of action is different. The frequency they are using is different. The data we collect is much more than any drug can collect – aAnd the truth is that we can complement a lot.

We can be complementary to the practice of medicine. We can supplement the use of a drug. We can complement the way you change your behavior and lifestyle around things like diet, exercise, sleep.

So I think you are going to see this evolving model now; We call this technique perfect care. You are going to see this combination of perfect drugs Which includes digital therapeutics With step-by-step care, moving from a digital solution to a coaching / therapist / physician service to a digital AI solution.

We personally believe that proper care will become an influential model for prescription digital therapeutics and related services in the future. Look at the integration of these Headspace and ginger, it’s a perfect-care strategy combination. You look at the integration between Teladoc and Livongo. This is a perfect-care consolidation strategy. You look at the integration between Amwell and SilverCloud. This is a perfect-care consolidation strategy.

If you have this new model, how are you going to charge for it? Because there are lots of different pieces, right? There’s coaching, there’s therapists, there’s physicians, there’s digital therapeutics, there’s a digital front door and there’s a consumer-oriented part. You can have multiple different types of partners, from payers to employers, to employers, to pharma companies. And so I think you’re going to find a lot of creative monetization strategies that companies have because they follow proper care.

MHN: How can you get a provider on board? If prescription digital therapies are not a prescription or prescription product, how would you persuade them to recommend them?

What: I interviewed doctors in the diabetes space a few years ago who wrote digital therapeutics, and I asked them, “How do you decide when to write digital therapeutics to a patient?”

And they said, “We have five questions.”

These questions are: Number one, does this patient do what I usually tell him to do? They say that about 20% of my patients never do what I tell them to do. So I’m not going to tell them to do this.

Then they say I have about 20% of patients who do what I tell them to do. So do they really need digital therapeutics? If they do everything else I told them to do, maybe not.

And then they say that 20% of my patients don’t have a smartphone, or they don’t have the data plan they need, or the technical sophistication to do it. I’m not going to write this to someone who doesn’t seem technically knowledgeable enough to use it. Then 20% of my patients don’t have a health plan that would cover anything like that.

They go through that, what results their 20% patients who are good candidates based on their judgment. I am not saying that these physicians are accurate in their assessment and judgment. But whether they are right is almost not considered if they see the world this way, and they will behave this way.

So this is why when we look at these therapeutic fields, we have to think and ask ourselves, “Is this a product that will be prescribed for every diabetic patient? Or will it be prescribed only for 20% of diabetic patients, because this screen, This trajectory that goes through doctors? ”

I think we need to educate our doctors about what is available, which patients will use them and how we will use them.

There is also this concern among physicians, which was really brought to the fore when EMR was taken 15 or more years ago, which means doctors don’t want more data. They have cautious fatigue. They’ve got data fatigue. So if this digital therapeutic generates more data, great, I don’t want to be burdened by it unless it’s an emergency.

So who’s going to determine which data is showing urgent vs. extra data that I can ignore? What are the risks of getting data and ignoring it?

Now, I have brought disruptive technology to the market in the past. One of the things I’ve learned is that you shouldn’t try to convince people against their desire to adopt technology in the early parts of your innovation life cycle.

You’ve got these early adopters of a technology, and the challenge for a company like ours and others in this space is to find those early adopters. Because they are the people with whom you spend your time. If they understand, they will adopt.

Now, that’s only 20% of the market. But that’s okay. Thus all new disruptive technologies are adopted. They are accepted by these groups who are willing to experiment, try new things. They feel comfortable with it and they start using it. Then you’ve got that next group and then the next. Within a decade, you then get mass acceptance.

Mercury Healthcare acquires WebMD analysis expert

Digital health content and services provider WebMD has announced that it has acquired technology and data analytics company Mercury Healthcare from private equity firm Wester Capital Partners for an undisclosed amount.

Through the agreement, Mercury will join the WebMD provider, focusing on the company’s business consumer-physician engagement and clinical education. Mercury’s analytics solutions are designed to give the health system the ability to analyze, target and communicate meaningful information to the target patient, as well as provide transparency and performance data to the provider.

The company also offers services that target patient-containment strategies, patient-placement solutions, including a library of pre-built connectors and APIs, and data analysis solutions with tiered data layering and predictive models.

“The addition of Mercury Healthcare accelerates our goal of communicating every decision point in the patient’s journey, from discovery to recovery,” said Ann Billy, general health and group general manager at WebMD Provider Services, in a statement.

He called Mercury’s acquisition a “major investment” in WebMD’s ongoing strategy to empower clients with the best data, content, technology and services.

“The integration of these two industry leaders will strengthen each healthcare system with the necessary solutions so that each patient receives the care they need to ensure when and how they need it,” Billy continued.

Why it matters

According to a recent interview with Kyruus’s Scott Andrews on HIMSS TV and HealthSparq’s Harlan Edlin, the epidemic has made a big difference in the relationship between consumers and their healthcare providers.

As the channels of patient care become more fragmented, it is vital that coordination in patient-provider communication becomes more integrated.

Greater trend

The agreement follows the acquisition of WebMD’s Wellness Network last July, which creates educational resources and engagement tools for patients and includes a library of video and printable resources that touch 24 therapeutic areas.

In February WellSky announced plans to acquire patient-recruiting tools TapCloud, a patient-oriented app that allows users to interact with physicians and report symptoms,

Clinically, providers can access information about patient-reported outcomes. EHR-agnostic technology allows doctors to communicate with patients.

With the spread of monkeypox, the US plans to launch a vaccine

Federal health officials announced Tuesday that clinics across the country will begin vaccinating anyone who may be exposed to the virus against monkeypox.

Until now, only people with known exposure were vaccinated.

States will receive a dose of a safe and new monkeypox vaccine called Jynneos from federal stocks, based on the number of cases and the proportion of the state’s population at risk of serious disease, officials said in a news briefing.

State health authorities may request the supply of an older vaccine developed for smallpox, which is also thought to provide protection against monkeypox.

The Department of Health and Human Services will immediately provide 56,000 doses of the Genius vaccine and an additional 240,000 doses in the coming weeks. A further 750,000 doses are expected to be available in the summer and a total of 1.6 million doses will be available by the end of this year.

“There are some limitations to the current supply of this vaccine, and for this reason the administration’s current vaccine strategy prioritizes making it available to those who need it most urgently,” said Dr. Rochelle Walenski, director of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

The old smallpox vaccine, called ACAM2000, is associated with severe side effects, including death in immunocompromised, pregnant women, and older adults.

The new vaccination plan drew sharp criticism from experts, who said the campaign was too short and slow to take effect. The longer it takes for the monkeypox to take hold, the more likely it is that the virus will enter the United States, especially among men who have sex with men, researchers have warned.

“Many of us are concerned that the window is closing for us to eradicate monkeypox,” said Dr. Celine Gounder, an infectious disease specialist and public health editor at Kaiser Health News.

“If we don’t start vaccinating more quickly and comprehensively, it will be a very difficult time for us to contain it,” he said. Ideally, monkeypox tests and vaccines could be given at LGBTQ Pride events across the country to reach men at high risk of contracting the virus, Dr Gounder added.

Some experts say the plan was also unfair to at-risk men who would not have access to the Genius vaccine, especially those who have HIV and cannot safely get the old coccyx vaccine.

“It won’t be enough to meet the need,” said Elizabeth Finlay, communications director for the National Coalition of STD Directors. “Also, without better testing ability, a strategy based on contact with a positive case becomes flat.”

It’s also not clear what qualifies as potential exposure, he added: “Do you need to know if someone tested positive at the event, or would you just say, ‘Oh, I went to a rave and I want to be safe’?”

Many physicians are concerned about the side effects and scars of the old smallpox vaccine, as well as the misinformation and hesitation about the vaccine, Ms Finlay said. “We told doctors there was no way they would give someone ACAM2000 in hell,” he said.

Genius vaccine, on the other hand, has never been used on this scale, and federal health officials say they will keep an eye out for unexpected side effects.

The administration has so far provided more than 9,000 doses of the Jynneos vaccine and 300 courses of antiviral treatment in 32 jurisdictions across the country, officials said Tuesday.

The European Union is adopting a similar plan, sending 5,300 of its 100,000 Genius doses to Spain, with the highest number of cases, followed by Portugal, Germany and Belgium. Other member states will receive the dose in July and August.

The number of monkeypox has increased rapidly in many countries in Europe and the United States.

As of June 28, there were 306 cases in 27 states and 156 cases in the District of Columbia, up from a week earlier. Dr. Walensky said the CDC has enabled its emergency operations center to better monitor and respond to outbreaks.

Dr J Verma, director of the Colonel’s Center for Pandemic Prevention and Response, said the numbers reported could be underestimated. “It’s pretty clear to me and I think for many others the epidemic is much bigger than the number of our official cases.” He said.

In view of the growing number, the available doses will not be enough to meet the demand. The Washington Department of Health on Monday proposed an appointment to vaccinate 300 monkeypox; The slots are full in less than 15 minutes.

New York City, which has identified 55 cases of monkeypox as of Tuesday, had 1,000 doses of the genius vaccine in hand. The city’s health department began administering the vaccines at a single clinic in Chelsea, where clients were primarily wealthy white men who had sex with men.

The city offers the first dose June 23 at noon. Less than two hours later, officials said Announcement That clinic could no longer arrange the walk and booked an appointment until June 27th. Until Tuesday, the city was Still waiting For more ticker doses to be available.

“It started and then it stopped, and it started without anyone preparing, and I’m not sure when it will come back,” said Keletso Makofane, a social network epidemiologist at Harvard University’s FXB Center for Health and Human Rights.

“All of these uncertainties don’t help build the confidence we need to have,” Dr. McAufen said.

Several experts also took issue with the position and said it would have been more justified to offer vaccines in clinics frequently by black men with untreated HIV and limited access to healthcare.

Should you apply sunscreen or foundation first?

Q: I wear full face makeup on a layer of sunscreen every day. Does it reduce my protection from UV rays?

The key to reducing your risk of wrinkles from skin cancer, sunburn and sun damage is to include sunscreen in your daily routine and apply it – and reapply – correctly.

Fortunately, when it comes to wearing makeup and sunscreen together, there is some good news, says Dr. Nikhil Dhingra, a dermatologist at Spring Street Dermatology in New York City: No matter how much foundation, concealer, blush or highlighter you apply during your period. Makeup routine, you will still be protected from the sun – unless you follow a few simple steps.

An important way to make sure you are really protected from harmful UV rays is to apply your sunscreen as a last step in your morning skin care routine, but before you start applying any makeup.

Chemical sunscreens have filters that penetrate the skin and absorb UV light, whereas physical (or mineral) sunscreens sit on the skin and scatter UV light. Because of these processes, sunscreen is most effective when applied directly to clean skin.

After you wash your face in the morning and apply skin care products like toner, serum, moisturizer or oil on your sunscreen. Dermatologists recommend using a minimum of sun protection factor 30.

Studies have shown that people generally do not use adequate sunscreen for adequate protection. Dr. Amanda Doyle, a dermatologist at the Rusak Dermatology Clinic in New York City, said most apply a quarter of the amount they need for the whole body. According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, you need about two milligrams of sunscreen per square centimeter of skin to achieve the advertised SPF.

Since everyone is different, this means there may be more or less sunscreen depending on the size of your face. To make the application a little easier, New York-based aesthetist Tiara Willis recommends The rule of two fingers To measure enough sunscreen for your face and neck (cover the length of your middle and index finger with sunscreen).

Before applying any makeup on top of your sunscreen, give it at least two minutes to soak into the skin. Avoid touching your face at this time. Dr. Kiran Mian, a dermatologist at Hudson Dermatology and Laser Surgery in New York City, says adding too much makeup too soon can dilute your sunscreen or make contact with ingredients, rendering them ineffective.

Think of applying sunscreen like drawing a house: apply it in an even, thick coat, then give it enough time to dry before touching or sorting. Dr. Mian recommends doing something like brushing your eyebrows after applying sunscreen to keep yourself busy in the interim. If your sunscreen base is properly dried and set, your makeup ingredients will not negatively affect its SPF.

Many foundations, beauty balms and color-correcting creams contain sunscreen, which may seem like a convenient way to protect your skin without compromising your makeup routine. However, makeup with SPF is not enough as your only sunscreen alternative because you need to use it a lot more to effectively protect your skin – more than most people usually use for their daily look.

Of course, adding SPF to your makeup doesn’t hurt, because, when it comes to sunscreen, there’s more. A study published in 2021 even concluded that layering makeup on sunscreen enhances overall sun protection. This is because all makeup, even products that do not have built-in SPF, have filters like physical sunscreen, which can provide extra protection if your sunscreen base layer is not enough.

Sunscreen should be reapplied every two hours, or after swimming or sweating. Even if you sit by the window when you work, you have to reapply, because the glass does not significantly block UVA or UVB rays. In general, re-applying sunscreen is just as easy as staining another coat, but it can be more complicated when you apply makeup.

Somewhat disappointing news: There is not enough research to prove how effective re-application of SPF on makeup is. And there are reasons to think this is not ideal, because we know that sunscreen is most effective when applied as close to the skin as possible and because it is challenging to apply enough sunscreen on top of makeup to be protective enough. For example, powdered sunscreens are a tempting alternative to reapplying because of their portability and usefulness as a quick touch-up tool, but in reality, says Dr. Kula Suvidjinsky, medical director of the Skin of Color Center at Mount Sinai Medical Center. , You need to apply about one teaspoon of powdered sunscreen on your face to reach the advertised SPF.

SPF setting sprays, and sunscreen sprays in general, are appealing for their easy application, but the truth is that they still need to rub into the skin to provide adequate coverage from the sun, which negates the supposed benefit.

Also, keep in mind that SPF is not incremental. “If your sunscreen is SPF 30, and then you apply an SPF 15 moisturizer, you don’t have SPF 45 protection,” Dr. Mian said.

So what should you do now? Experts say you should use a method that will encourage you to re-apply your sunscreen, until you realize that you probably won’t get the fully advertised SPF. Whether you reapply with a powdered sunscreen, dip your face in an SPF setting spray or squirt the sunscreen lotion on the back of your hands and pat it on your makeup, even a small SPF boost is better than nothing, experts say.

Kyra is a staff writer at Blackwell Workcutter who covers health and sleep. His work has previously been published in Occuplayer, The Nocturnal and Nylon Magazine.

W.V. Drug distributors are to blame for the opioids crisis in the county

A federal judge has ruled that the country’s three largest drug distributors cannot be blamed for the opioid epidemic in one of the country’s most devastated counties – a place where 81 million prescription painkillers were sent to a population of less than 100,000 in eight years. .

U.S. District Court Judge David A. for the Southern District of West Virginia. About a year after the trial by Faber Huntington and Cable County ended, he expressed his views on the July 4 holiday, which focused on an Oscar-nominated documentary called “Heroin (E)” about the effects of prescription painkillers.

According to the ruling, the rate of fatal overdose in Cable County increased from 16.6 to 213.9 per 100,000 people from 2001 to 2017.

Judge Faber County and the city acknowledged the dire costs of disabling drug distribution companies – Amerisourcebergen, McKesson and Cardinal Health – but added that “although there is a natural tendency to blame in such cases, they must not make decisions based on empathy.” But on facts and law. “

His decision points to the difficulty of determining responsibility for a decade-long catastrophe where many agencies had a role to play, including drug manufacturers, pharmacy chains, doctors and federal surveillance agencies, as well as drug distributors.

Drug distributors typically fill pharmacy orders by trucking drugs from manufacturers to hospitals, clinics, and stores and are responsible for managing their inventory. Like other companies in the drug supply chain, distributors must comply with established federal limits for regulated substances such as prescription opioids and have an internal monitoring system in place to identify problematic orders. City and county lawyers argued that distributors should investigate orders from pharmacies that requested drugs in disproportionate amounts that were incompatible with this small community population.

But Judge Faber ruled: “At best, distributors can detect optics at the dispenser’s order, which can be detected by doctors who may have intentionally or unintentionally violated medical standards. Distributors are also not pharmacists proficient in evaluating red flags that may be present on prescriptions. “

The judge aptly rejected the legal argument that the distributors caused a “public nuisance”, a claim widely used throughout the national opioid case and which has so far yielded mixed results in several state and federal tests.

The three distributors finalized an agreement earlier this year to settle thousands of lawsuits brought by state and local governments, where they agreed to pay 21 21 billion over 18 years for addiction treatment and prevention services. But Cable County and the city of Huntington, often described as Ground Zero for the crisis in the United States, refuse to sign, believing they can get more money by going to trial. They asked the companies for 2 billion.

“Trial is always a gamble, and it doesn’t pay off,” said Elizabeth Birch, a professor at Georgia School of Law University who has closely followed the national opioid case.

During the trial, county and city attorneys ridiculed Ameersourcebergen’s emails, calling West Virginians “Pilbilis,” and referring the area as “Oxycontinville.” A company executive said the samples were cherry-picked and an example of employees expressing work fatigue.

In a statement applauding the ruling, Cardinal Health said it had a strict screening system. Distributors “do not manufacture, market or prescribe prescription drugs but only provide a secure channel to deliver all types of drugs from manufacturers to our thousands of hospital and pharmacy customers who distribute them to their patients on the basis of doctor-prescribed prescriptions.”

AmerisourceBergen noted that pharmaceutical distributors have been told to “walk a legal and ethical tug-of-war between providing access to essential drugs and working to prevent deviations from controlled substances.”

McKesson, in his statement, added: “We only distribute controlled substances, including opioids, in DEA-registered and state-licensed pharmacies” and argued that drug abuse and misuse is a problem that needs to be addressed by a comprehensive approach involving the private industry, government. , Providers and patients.

Steve Williams, the mayor of Huntington, who took office in 2012 because opioids were a waste of material, said the verdict could not measure his frustration, calling it “a blow to our city and community, but even we are resilient.” The face of adversity. “

Citizens, he said, “do not have to bear the main responsibility of ensuring that epidemics of this magnitude never happen again.”

Lawyers for Cable County and Huntington, and the executive committee of a national opioid plaintiff, have issued a joint statement expressing their deep frustration.

“We felt evidence from witness statements, company documents and extensive data sets that these defendants were responsible for building and overseeing the infrastructure that flooded West Virginia with opioids,” they said. “On the one hand, our gratitude goes to first-responders, government officials, medical professionals, researchers and many more who have testified to bring the truth to light. “

The county and city are considering whether to appeal.

Although the gamble of pressing the case was risky, some other governments succeeded in the trial. The state of Washington also refused to sign the national settlement, went to trial against the distributors and settled more than 46 46 million in May, which it received in the national settlement. In June, Oklahoma also negotiated with distributors for more money than proposed a national settlement.

The state of West Virginia settled its lawsuits against distributors for a total of 73 million a few years ago, but local governments were free to pursue their own lawsuits. The result of this lawsuit, Mrs. Birch says, is “a cautionary tale about offering a guaranteed money settlement.”

A new West Virginia trial against the same three distributors was scheduled to open in state court Tuesday, brought by another cluster of West Virginia counties and cities, represented by the same lawyers who followed the case and decided Monday. However, the start date was postponed in court on Tuesday.

Advocates weigh in on how to guide women who receive abortion pills: shots

Julie Edwards, a patient advocacy program manager with planned parents in Tennessee and North Mississippi, had a self-administered abortion as a teenager and said they would become more common and be safer.

Rachel Lacovon / WPLN


Hide captions

Toggle caption

Rachel Lacovon / WPLN


Julie Edwards, a patient advocacy program manager with planned parents in Tennessee and North Mississippi, had a self-administered abortion as a teenager and said they would become more common and be safer.

Rachel Lacovon / WPLN

At a rally in Nashville, planned parenthood organizer Julie Edwards looked at some “back alley abortion” images of symptoms, including a bloody coat hanger. But, as Edwards took to the streets in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision on the right to abortion, he told the crowd that it was not like the day before. Rowe vs. Wade.

About a decade ago, Edwards was a teenager and received medication from some older friends. Edwards said it could be the new norm in an abortion-prohibited state like Tennessee.

“I had a self-administered abortion standing in front of you, getting abortion pills from people in my community. And I’m safe,” Edwards told Cheers. “It’s going to take us all to keep each other’s privacy, to hold each other’s hands, to keep each other safe.”

Medications are now available for first trimester abortions. And it has become the primary means of abortion.

This method contains two prescription drugs that have been on the market ever since Rowe The decision was made in 1973. Mifepristone is taken first. These are abortion drugs that are fairly expensive and highly regulated, usually taken at a doctor’s office or health clinic. After a day or two, the patient takes misoprostol, which is much more widely available and can act on its own to cause miscarriage. The drug was developed in the 1970s to treat ulcers but has several other off-label uses in addition to abortion, such as relieving arthritis. It is even prescribed for animals, so veterinary supply stores carry drugs. Mesoprostol is even sold over-the-counter in Mexico.

“It’s really based on what anyone can get. And in a self-administered context, the only way to get mifepristone plus misoprostol via the internet is to wait for delivery,” said Susan Yano, a spokeswoman for Women Help, a nonprofit organization across four continents. Which works to increase access to abortion.

International agencies ship both drugs worldwide – but not in the United States because laws vary greatly from state to state. Social media sites like Facebook and Instagram have already started pulling posts offering to send these drugs in the mail. Many states that have now banned abortion have recently strengthened their laws on mail-order abortion drugs.

“We still have the right to share information,” Yano said. “People use the internet. People use their phones. People will find ways to get these pills.”

Using safe abortion pills

But it’s more than just finding drugs, which is why Yano’s company has detailed guidelines on how to use them safely. And she provides training for local reproductive rights groups like no other.

The Linsee Bee of Montana-based self-guided abortion began making video tutorials late last year and published them on YouTube, offering ways to make the process more sacred by using misoprostol alone and building an altar, burning incense and burning candles. . She even provides post-abortion yoga instruction.

Multiple rounds are required with a single misoprostol. Nausea is common. And the drug induces cramping and bleeding which can be worrisome for those who are not ready.

Even some OB-GYNs quietly support self-administered abortion.

“I’m more concerned about people who can’t go to one of these sources and they’re so desperate that they take matters into their own hands,” said Dr. Nicki Jite, OB-GYN at the University of Tennessee Medical Center.

She said clinical counseling is ideal before taking the pill combo. For example, some patients are anemic and may have enough bleeding in need of emergency care. And some don’t do well with just pain and lots of blood.

“Not every patient is a good candidate to have an abortion at home,” she said.

But at the moment, Zite is not able to offer that advice. In Tennessee, she will now be at risk of a felony and jail time under a six-week ban in effect, and an all-out abortion will be banned for effective August. And it’s not clear how far law enforcement is willing to go.

References to coat hangers have been used in protest of the decision to reverse Rowe vs. Wade. Abortion rights activists say “self-administered abortion” is much safer today because of drugs – but women still need guidance.

Caroline Egars / WPLN


Hide captions

Toggle caption

Caroline Egars / WPLN


References to coat hangers have been used in protest of the decision to reverse Rowe vs. Wade. Abortion rights activists say “self-administered abortion” is much safer today because of drugs – but women still need guidance.

Caroline Egars / WPLN

Tennessee law specifically exempts a pregnant woman from trial. But a motivated prosecutor could find a way to press charges against a self-administered abortion, said Nashville Criminal Defense Attorney David Robin.

“I mean, it’s full of danger,” Rabin said. “I would strongly recommend getting a drug against a woman using such quote-quote underground methods.”

He said it was better to have a legal abortion in another state. But Tennessee abortion rights activists say they know travel will be difficult for many. And even for those who can, a self-managed abortion may be more convenient. To some extent, however, reproductive rights groups are willing to help navigate the legal gray area.

Risk assessment

Healthy & Free Tennessee, an organization working to promote sexual health and reproductive freedom, has organized a number of training sessions through Women Help Women in recent weeks. Policy director Nina Gurak says their biggest concern is not health complications – it’s a legal risk.

“We recommend that if someone self-manages an abortion that they have a supporter or friend. That supporter or friend may be at greater legal risk than the actual person conducting the abortion themselves,” he said. “And then you have to decide for yourself – is this something I feel comfortable with? Is it something I don’t feel comfortable with?”

State agencies, including abortion bans, have their own risk of assessment. They feel confident that the First Amendment protects the sharing of medical information approved by the World Health Organization.

But abortion rights advocates are divided between raising awareness and becoming the target of anti-abortion lawmakers – who are no longer limited. Rowe vs. Wade.

“We are certainly concerned about the criminalization of abortion or self-administered abortion and abortion pills.” “We want to balance the information the community needs with what they need to decide for themselves.”

Should you apply sunscreen or foundation first?

Q: I wear full face makeup on a layer of sunscreen every day. Does it reduce my protection from UV rays?

The key to reducing your risk of wrinkles from skin cancer, sunburn and sun damage is to include sunscreen in your daily routine and apply it – and reapply – correctly.

Fortunately, when it comes to wearing makeup and sunscreen together, there is some good news, says Dr. Nikhil Dhingra, a dermatologist at Spring Street Dermatology in New York City: No matter how much foundation, concealer, blush or highlighter you apply during your period. Makeup routine, you will still be protected from the sun – unless you follow a few simple steps.

An important way to make sure you are really protected from harmful UV rays is to apply your sunscreen as a last step in your morning skin care routine, but before you start applying any makeup.

Chemical sunscreens have filters that penetrate the skin and absorb UV light, whereas physical (or mineral) sunscreens sit on the skin and scatter UV light. Because of these processes, sunscreen is most effective when applied directly to clean skin.

After you wash your face in the morning and apply skin care products like toner, serum, moisturizer or oil on your sunscreen. Dermatologists recommend using a minimum of sun protection factor 30.

Studies have shown that people generally do not use adequate sunscreen for adequate protection. Dr. Amanda Doyle, a dermatologist at the Rusak Dermatology Clinic in New York City, said most apply a quarter of the amount they need for the whole body. According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, you need about two milligrams of sunscreen per square centimeter of skin to achieve the advertised SPF.

Since everyone is different, this means there may be more or less sunscreen depending on the size of your face. To make the application a little easier, New York-based aesthetist Tiara Willis recommends The rule of two fingers To measure enough sunscreen for your face and neck (cover the length of your middle and index finger with sunscreen).

Before applying any makeup on top of your sunscreen, give it at least two minutes to soak into the skin. Avoid touching your face at this time. Dr. Kiran Mian, a dermatologist at Hudson Dermatology and Laser Surgery in New York City, says adding too much makeup too soon can dilute your sunscreen or make contact with ingredients, rendering them ineffective.

Think of applying sunscreen like drawing a house: apply it in an even, thick coat, then give it enough time to dry before touching or sorting. Dr. Mian recommends doing something like brushing your eyebrows after applying sunscreen to keep yourself busy in the interim. If your sunscreen base is properly dried and set, your makeup ingredients will not negatively affect its SPF.

Many foundations, beauty balms and color-correcting creams contain sunscreen, which may seem like a convenient way to protect your skin without compromising your makeup routine. However, makeup with SPF is not enough as your only sunscreen alternative because you need to use it a lot more to effectively protect your skin – more than most people usually use for their daily look.

Of course, adding SPF to your makeup doesn’t hurt, because, when it comes to sunscreen, there’s more. A study published in 2021 even concluded that layering makeup on sunscreen enhances overall sun protection. This is because all makeup, even products that do not have built-in SPF, have filters like physical sunscreen, which can provide extra protection if your sunscreen base layer is not enough.

Sunscreen should be reapplied every two hours, or after swimming or sweating. Even if you sit by the window when you work, you have to reapply, because the glass does not significantly block UVA or UVB rays. In general, re-applying sunscreen is just as easy as staining another coat, but it can be more complicated when you apply makeup.

Somewhat disappointing news: There is not enough research to prove how effective re-application of SPF on makeup is. And there are reasons to think this is not ideal, because we know that sunscreen is most effective when applied as close to the skin as possible and because it is challenging to apply enough sunscreen on top of makeup to be protective enough. For example, powdered sunscreens are a tempting alternative to reapplying because of their portability and usefulness as a quick touch-up tool, but in reality, says Dr. Kula Suvidjinsky, medical director of the Skin of Color Center at Mount Sinai Medical Center. , You need to apply about one teaspoon of powdered sunscreen on your face to reach the advertised SPF.

SPF setting sprays, and sunscreen sprays in general, are appealing for their easy application, but the truth is that they still need to rub into the skin to provide adequate coverage from the sun, which negates the supposed benefit.

Also, keep in mind that SPF is not incremental. “If your sunscreen is SPF 30, and then you apply an SPF 15 moisturizer, you don’t have SPF 45 protection,” Dr. Mian said.

So what should you do now? Experts say you should use a method that will encourage you to re-apply your sunscreen, until you realize that you probably won’t get the fully advertised SPF. Whether you reapply with a powdered sunscreen, dip your face in an SPF setting spray or squirt the sunscreen lotion on the back of your hands and pat it on your makeup, even a small SPF boost is better than nothing, experts say.

Kyra is a staff writer at Blackwell Workcutter who covers health and sleep. His work has previously been published in Occuplayer, The Nocturnal and Nylon Magazine.

Her PTSD, and my struggle to live with it

I tried Maintain some similarities from my former life: I worked on the book, started a new research project, was offered a job, and briefly considered moving the two of us to Philadelphia. When I wasn’t working, I made appointments and returned calls: therapists, doctors, human resources, insurance companies, colleagues, family and friends. Jason continues to go to therapy every week because the scars from his face fade. But he was suffering from insomnia – nightmares and hypervigilance kept him awake at night and he spent most of his day watching TV and going to sleep on the sofa in the living room. I scheduled food delivery and left the laundry in the fluff-and-fold. I looked for blackout screens and white-sound machines on Amazon. I have fought and fought.

Then, I ran away.

On the first anniversary of the beating, I was in Los Angeles on a reporting trip. For the second anniversary, I was on the road, working on a new research project.

When I was away, I desperately tried to feel something — anything – for myself. In Helsinki, Finland, to speak at a conference of Nordic social workers, I sat in 190-degree smoke gold and then padded outside, barefoot and mostly naked, drowning in a hole in the ice of the Baltic Sea above my head. In the water deposited near the black, once, twice, thrice.

In 2016, I was on the road for 147 days. In 2017, I went 97 days.

We need the money I have earned through the engagement of speaking and research grants. But it would be unreasonable to claim that all my travels were materially necessary. I wanted space and time away from the push of PTSD. I Wanted I want to leave as much as I can

In December 2017, We decided to experiment with travel together. Before the attack, we were part of the adventure – we drove hundreds of miles along Route 20, visiting 1930s attractions: wandering through a museum of petrified animals, spelling at Howe Caverns, choosing a favorite roadside cheeseburger. Tried. We trampled the Adirondacks and floated in the Sacandaga Reservoir. He went to take pictures of the ruined 19th century hotel under the security fence while I was watching from the car.

We wanted to try to restore that feeling. We used all my Amtrak points to buy two round-trip tickets in a slipper car for a seven-day trip to Montana for my mom’s 75th birthday. Theoretically, it was perfect: a small fish bowl of our own, traveling across the country at a leisurely pace. I thought we would read, play cards. I bought a small electric kettle so we could make tea when the earth went out the window.